My Blog

Posts for: October, 2020

By Alan M. Simons, DDS Oral Implantology
October 29, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants   crowns  
ChoosingaScreworCementtoAttachanImplantCrown

If you've lost a tooth, you have a number of options for replacing it. Perhaps the best choice in terms of lifelikeness and durability is a dental implant.

All implants have the same basic architecture: a titanium metal post imbedded in the jawbone to replace the root; and an abutment, a metal collar that links the post with a lifelike porcelain crown. But implants can vary in how the crown attaches to the abutment and post — either cemented to the abutment or screwed through the abutment to the post.

Either method will permanently secure the crown to the implant. But there are advantages and disadvantages for each.

A screw-retained crown may better facilitate any future repair that might be needed. For a skilled dentist it's a simple matter of removing the screw and then the crown from the abutment. There's less risk of damage to the implant during repairs or crown replacement. Many dentists also prefer screws for crowns placed at the same time they're installing the implant post (a procedure called immediate loading).

The screw access hole, however, could pose a cosmetic problem. Although we can cover it over with tooth-colored filling, it may still be noticeable and unattractive especially for a tooth visible when you smile (in the smile zone). There's also the possibility the porcelain around the access hole could chip.

By contrast, cemented crowns have a smooth, unbroken surface and are aesthetically ideal for smile zone teeth. But the cement could interact poorly with gum and bone tissue in some patients, causing inflammation and possible bone loss.

And unlike screw-retained crowns, cemented crowns are difficult to remove for implant repair. We may have to drill through the crown to access the screw between the abutment and the post, and then repair it cosmetically if we use the same crown. Again, the final result may not be quite as visually appealing.

In the end, it will depend on the implant's location, how your body reacts to the cement or your dentist's preference. In either case, though, you'll have a tooth replacement that's functional, life-like and able to endure for many years to come.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How Crowns Attach to Implants.”


By Alan M. Simons, DDS Oral Implantology
October 19, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: metal allergies  
HerearetheFactsontheImpactofMetalAllergiesonDentalWork

Allergic reactions aren't necessarily bad: they're your body's responses to possible threats from foreign substances. But the response can go too far and cause a reaction as minor as a skin rash or as life-threatening as a multi-system shutdown called anaphylaxis.

Anything can cause an allergy: animal fur, food, chemicals — or metals. Because metals play such a large role in dental care, it's only natural we're alert to the possibility of allergic reactions from a procedure.

But don't postpone your implants or other dental work just yet — the threat isn't nearly that ominous. Here are a few facts about dental metal allergies to help you sort it out.

Allergic reactions are rare for metals used in medical and dental procedures. Although reactions to metals in joint replacements or coronary stents leading to failure do happen, actual occurrences are rare. Most metal allergies manifest as a skin reaction to jewelry or clothing. It's less likely with medical or dental metals because they're chosen specifically for their compatibility with living tissue.

Amalgam fillings account for most dental work reactions. Dentists have used this multi-metal alloy for fillings and other restorations for well over a century. Tooth-colored resins are now used for most fillings, but amalgam is still used in less visible back teeth. It's very rare for a person to experience a reaction to amalgam, but when it does occur it usually results in minor inflammation or a rash.

Implant titanium isn't just bio-compatible — it's also osteophilic. Titanium is the perfect choice for implants not only because it's tissue friendly, but also because it's bone friendly (osteophilic). Once implanted in the jaw, bone cells naturally grow and adhere to it to create a more durable bond. Not only does the body usually tolerate titanium, it welcomes it with open arms!

While it's still possible for you to have an allergy to implant titanium, the chances are remote. In one recent study involving 1,500 implant patients, titanium allergies occurred in less than 1%. So the chances are high a metal allergy won't stop you from obtaining a smile-transforming restoration with dental implants.

If you would like more information on allergies and dental work, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Metal Allergies to Dental Implants.”


By Alan M. Simons, DDS Oral Implantology
October 09, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants   dentures  
Implant-SupportedDenturesCouldImproveYourBoneHealth

Generations have depended on dentures to effectively and affordably replace lost teeth. But they do have a major weakness: They contribute to jawbone loss that creates not only mouth and facial problems, but can also ruin a denture’s fit.

Bone loss is a normal consequence of losing teeth. The biting forces normally generated when we chew stimulate new bone to replace older bone. When a tooth is missing, however, so is that chewing stimulation. This can slow bone replacement growth and gradually decrease the density and volume of affected bone.

While dentures can restore dental appearance and function, they can’t restore this growth stimulation. What’s worse, the pressure of the dentures against the gum-covered jaw ridge they rest upon may irritate the underlying bone and accelerate loss.

But there is a solution to the problem of denture-related bone loss: an implant-supported denture. Rather than obtaining its major support from the gum ridges, this new type of denture is secured by strategically-placed implants that connect with it.

Besides the enhanced support they can provide to a denture restoration, implants can also deter bone loss. This is because of the special affinity bone cells have with an implant’s imbedded titanium post. The gradual growth of bone on and around the implant surface not only boosts the implant’s strength and durability, it can also improve bone health.

There are two types of implant-supported dentures. One is a removable appliance that connects with implants installed in the jaw (three or more for the upper jaw or as few as two in the lower). It may also be possible to retrofit existing dentures to connect with implants.

The other type is a fixed appliance a dentist permanently installs by screwing it into anywhere from four and six implants. The fixed implant-supported denture is closer to the feel of real teeth (you’ll brush and floss normally), but it’s usually more costly than the removable implant-supported denture.

While more expensive than traditional ones, implant-supported dentures still cost less than other restorations like individual implant tooth replacements. They may also help deter bone loss, which may lead to a longer lasting fit with the dentures. Visit your dentist for an evaluation of your dental condition to see if you’re a good candidate for this advanced form of dental restoration.

If you would like more information on implant-supported dentures, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Overdentures & Fixed Dentures.”